Demarc Extension Nationwide Blog
Demarc Extension Nationwide Blog

April 16, 2015

Article from Cabling Installation & Maintenance Magazine

From Cabling Installation & Maintenance Magazine: “For some, frustration with demarcation extension remains standard

Twenty-five years after the FCC amended its definition of the demarcation point, extending the demarc can still give some private-network owners fits.

By Patrick McLaughlin

It has been 16 months since this publication covered the idea of customer-premises demarcation in detail (“Demarc extension is mostly uncharted territory,” December 2013). In those 16 month, by nearly any measure, little has changed related to the tasks and challenges associated with the stretch of cabling commonly called the demarc extension. Demarc Extension Nationwide (www.demarcextension.com) defines that stretch of cabling as follows: “The transmission path originating from the interface of the access provider’s side of a telecommunications circuit demarcation point within a premises and ending at the termination point prior to the interface of the edge customer premises equipment [CPE]. This may include in-segment equipment, media converters and patch cords as required to complete the circuit’s transmission path to the edge CPE.”

Veterans of in-building wiring systems likely are unsurprised that nothing has changed over the past 16 months; many would argue that nothing has changed in the nearly 25 years (August 1990) since the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) amended its definition of the term “demarcation point” to help clarify confusion that existed over the location(s) of demarcation points in multi-unit buildings. That 1990 amendment sought to ensure the demarc would be near the minimum point of entry (MPOE), which is the point at which the service provider’s cabling enters the premises.

Read full article from Cabling Installation & Maintenance Magazine

Filed under: News,Resources — Tags: — concerttechnologies @ 6:36 pm



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